Is the book ‘Conversations with the Crow’ trustworthy or fiction?

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Is the book 'Conversations with the Crow' trustworthy or fiction?

Deepak Singh Bisth

Votes: 8238

It is a non fiction book and you can read a few reviews of it here.

Gregory Douglas: Amazon.in: Kindle Store

Almost everyone knows that the CIA is similar to the ancient Ninja clans who will do anything to get the job done if they stand to benefit from it and in recent times a lot of secrets have come out about the dealing of the CIA from smuggling of drugs to supplying of weapons and assassinations.

Sammy Lahr

Votes: 6764

1) The Wheel of Time Series by Robert Jordan

This book is the definitive, classic fantasy series of our generation. Brandon Sanderson was chosen to finish the last several books in the series (after Robert Jordan passed) due to a similar writing-style. So if you like Brandon Sanderson, you’ll love this series. It is 14 books long but retains the same original, mesmerizing structure throughout it’s entirety. It never feels like it was expanded for commercial reasons, which is rare with large series.

With a fan-base that includes most of the fantasy community and word-count nearly as huge, I highly reccomend this book, especially if you appreciate Rothfuss and Sanderson. It will keep you satisfied for a long time, and then there’s the rereads…

2) Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

I first read this book when I was in the third grade, and it was my undisputed favorite until well into middle school. This isn’t at all to say that it is a junior or youth-intended novel.

In fact, Card said in the foreward of Ender’s Shadow that “it was never intended as a young-adult novel”, and that some of the reasons for its immense popularity with younger audiences was that “Ender’s Game is centered around a child, while the sequels are about adults; perhaps more important, Ender’s Game is, at least on the surface, a heroic, adventurous novel.”

Also, I was also that one kid who read Crime and Punishment in primary school, if that has anything to say about it.

Ender’s Game is intensely emotional, vividly intellectual, character-driven, and a painfully accurate tale of children confronting their inner demons. It is also, in my opinion and many others, one of the greatest Science Fiction novels of all time.

It has won the Nebula Award for Best Novel, Science Fiction Chronicle Reader Award for Best Novel, and Hugo Award for Best Novel, the most prestigious award in Science Fiction, held by greats like Ray Bradbury for Fahrenheit 451.

Perhaps the greatest thing about the book is the fact that—from a third-person limited perspective—the main character is a ruthless, calculating psychopath. Of course, nothing could be further from the truth, and this is found through a deeply profound and, honestly, beautiful, insight of the protagonist (Ender) through his eyes.

It takes place in a setting with aliens and spaceships and somehow manages to make all of that a backdrop for a brilliant psychological character study and an observation of group dynamics.

3) The Kingkiller Chronicle

I stopped counting how many times I read The Name of the Wind at the twentieth time through. Seriously. It has immensely impacted the way I write, my eloquence and diction, and truthfully—the way I see the world.

It is a deeply intimate coming-of-age story of a brilliant boy, and the not-so-brilliant scenarios he becomes involved with. It is the brainchild of Patrick Rothfuss, a perfectionist who has worked music into his words. Each page has a subtle grace, an incredible intricacy that can leave you laughing, crying, or clenching the book in rabid anticipation.

It is written impeccably—in such a fashion that the intelligent will experience a depth rarely found in the fantasy genre, yet balances it with action-packed scenes and rollicking story-telling.

If you give it the time, it will reward you greatly.

The worldbuilding is amazing, the characters three-dimensional, and the words are like magic. Truly a work of art; a song in everything but name.

10/10 would recommend.

4) The Gentlemen Bastards Series

I would highly recommend the Gentlemen Bastards series by Scott Lynch. I’ve read them a few times, and every new read-through reveals more details—many of them humorous—that I had not teased from the text earlier. The worldbuilding is of similar quality to Sanderson and Rothfuss.

It has the grander scope of The Way of Kings while still retaining the intimate story of The Name of the Wind. It sits next to them on my shelf. The main difference it has between those two books would be it’s humor—it’s a little more crass, but will leave you literally rolling with laughter. I have hurt myself more than once doing just that.

5) A Song of Ice and Fire

I have yet to finish this series, but the first three have been on-par with any book I’ve read. Unlike, say, works by Rothfuss or Sanderson the magic system is considered “soft-magic”, meaning less detailed, more mystical. Despite that, the story and characters are anything but soft.

This book is deeply engrossing; it’s characters possessing all of the dimensions that so many other books lack. This is the book that revolutionized the fantasy genre, inspiring other grim-and-gritty fantasy series like:

6) The First Law

This book has—hands down—the best written characters of any series I have come across. You will find yourself sympathizing with a torturer, hating the dashing swordsman, and rooting for the uncultured barbarian, only to have those feelings completely blown away and reversed in the matter of a chapter, only to have them switched again.

The author plays with your emotions like a bard would his lute—that is—often and with great skill. This book is not for the faint of heart, but for those who can stand the substantial cut of The Blade Itself, it will reward you with an intricate storyline and a narrative unparalleled.

7) The Sword of Truth series

Read this if you want a bit of a break but still a very good story. You won’t read anything you haven’t before, but the way it is written and relayed is extraordinary. The word choice is very good, and the worldbuilding remarkable. As I said, some consider this cliche and closer to a video-game than a book, but I still recommend it if you have free time. 7–8/10

8) The Broken Empire Series by Mark Lawrence

This vividly-written book takes the fantasy genre in a new direction. The main character is not a hero by any means, (the opening chapter shows him leading a gang of thieves to pillage a town), but you find yourself sympathizing with him all the same.

This book is dark, brooding, and extremely well-written. It is fast-paced while balancing a great story-line. I found myself mesmerized by Lawrence’s first-person narrative yet horrified at the person I was reading about. But, beyond any doubt, this is a book that every fantasy fan should read at least once — and many will read over and over again.

The teaser is as follows:

“When he was nine, he watched as his mother and brother were killed before him. By the time he was thirteen, he was the leader of a band of bloodthirsty thugs. By fifteen, he intends to be king…

It’s time for Prince Honorous Jorg Ancrath to return to the castle he turned his back on, to take what’s rightfully his. Since the day he hung pinned on the thorns of a briar patch and watched Count Renar’s men slaughter his mother and young brother, Jorg has been driven to vent his rage. Life and death are no more than a game to him—and he has nothing left to lose.

But treachery awaits him in his father’s castle. Treachery and dark magic. No matter how fierce his will, can one young man conquer enemies with power beyond his imagining?”

The series is currently six books long (all best-sellers) and will keep you busy—locked in morbid, adventurous fascination—for some time.

9) The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

As millions of fans can claim, this book is magical in more ways than one.

After reading the series numerous times, I can still open up to any book and feel a rush of happiness. Enthrallment in the story-line, passion for the style of writing, and love for the characters themselves.

All of this goes to show that Rowling is astonishingly wise. She took this fantastical, unachievable world, and filled it with actual people. Not do-gooders with impossible strength, not perfect incarnations of light. No, she wrote about people. About their flaws. She showed how real people think. She painted the story of an average person and how they lived. She demonstrated with incredible accuracy how love really sets hold on a human heart.

That is something so rarely achieved in fantasy, and it makes me happy to read over and over again.

She immortalized this book in our hearts and minds as something real. With interactive elements and an entire world at your fingertips due to the extended franchise. It opens up role-play, movie watching, dedicated discussion groups. It offers something for the old and the young, introverted or extroverted. Reading over the course of the series, you get to see old friends grow up a world away. You get to know every aspect of them and grow to love them while having never seen them in your life.

It is, in some ways, the perfect book.

I may have outgrown it a bit, and look upon it less and less as the years go by, but it still never fails to make me smile.

“After all this time?”“Always.”

10) I have yet to find a series with better worldbuilding than The Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson:

As of yet, there’s only three books—but over three thousand pages and a planned cycle of ten novels of similar size. He spent over 15 years conceptualizing the idea, and has written, (in his words), “hundreds of thousands of words just in worldbuilding” for this series.

Sanderson’s magnum opus has a richer world than nearly any other you will come across. Every detail is extremely vivid, each description gradually peeling a dust-cover away from the vast, colorful tapestry that is the world within The Stormlight Archive.

This book has everything an avid and intelligent reader of fantasy could want. It has constantly evolving characters, massive battles and action, and subtle political intrigue. It is a story of assassins and artists, warriors and scholars, kings and the slaves that rule under them—all at the same time. It is told from many different perspectives to offer broad and contradicting views to the same events that occur.

It takes Tolkien-level detail and combines it with heart-pounding action sequences and battle scenes, all written by an author with hands down the best magic-systems I’ve ever witnessed. It incites emotions and storms of thought to ensnare you, pulling you into a world of physical tempestuous turmoil and people full of suffering. Internal and external conflicts mix into an amalgam that paint the world into a breathtaking adventure.

Mystery hides in every shadow—the line between history and myth blurring as intricate organizations throughout the world are revealed, their plans and purposes dubious at best.

This is one of the best things I’ve ever read, hands-down. The author releases books far more often than some other known fantasy authors (not complaining, I swear, but *cough* Patrick Rothfuss. *cough*) so you’ll never wait too long for the next volume.

If you want a book that will enthrall you, make you a better writer, and present you with thought-provoking philosophies at the same time, The Stormlight Archive is for you.

I heartily recommend it.

11) Another personal favorite of mine is the British-authored CHERUB series.

Although the main character is just 13 in the first book, he is mature and ages quickly with the series, (ends with protagonist at 17 years old) making it likable for all ages. The premise is as follows:

“CHERUB agents are highly trained, extremely talented–and all under the age of seventeen. For official purposes, these agents do not exist. They are sent out on missions to spy on terrorists, hack into crucial documents, and gather intel on global threats—all without gadgets or weapons. It is an exceptionally dangerous job, but these agents have one crucial advantage: adults never suspect that teens are spying on them. “

It might sound a little childish—but honestly—I freaking love this series. The drama is perfectly executed, and the series as a whole is very realistic. It’s not, (let me repeat, NOT) like the move Spy Kids. There’s no super-secret-advanced tools used or anything. Instead, they demonstrate reconnaissance in the form of stealing documents and then trashing the place to cover it up, or pretending to be other people in the hopes of happening across important information.

CHERUB has everything: heart-pounding action, excellent character development/flaws, romance, and just that cool spy element. Highly recommend.

12) The Martian by Andy Weir

Even if you normally dislike the science-fiction genre, you’ll love this book. It focuses less on unlikely future technology so much as the internal struggles of a man millions of miles from everything he’s ever known, and those people so far away who are trying to get him back home.

And though this book seems on the surface to be a deeply introspective, novel, it’s hilarious. The main character has an evident sense of humor, utilized as a coping mechanism. One chapter, you’ll be clenching your side in laughter, and the next, gritting your teeth in animalistic anticipation.

The teaser on Amazon says:

“Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars.

Now, he’s sure he’ll be the first person to die there.

After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive.

Chances are, though, he won’t have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain-old “human error” are much more likely to kill him first.

But Mark isn’t ready to give up yet. Drawing on his ingenuity, his engineering skills—and a relentless, dogged refusal to quit—he steadfastly confronts one seemingly insurmountable obstacle after the next. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?”

This book is a step in the right direction. You’ll find no laser-guns here, but the message and emotional theme will be just as cutting.

13) The Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson

This book takes your favorite classic story elements and utilizes them to flip the fantasy genre on it’s head. It’s a hybrid epic fantasy heist story with a focus on political intrigue and powerful action scenes.

As Sanderson was writing this book, he wanted two central themes at the foundation:

1) He knew he wanted a heist story, like Sneakers or Ocean’s Eleven involving a gang of gentlemen thieves who each had a distinctive magic power. He wanted to build an entire world and magic system to show how these people could work together, combining their magics to accomplish incredible tasks.

2) And this is the interesting part: He wanted a story where the good-guys lost. That’s right. Everybody’s read the story of the poor peasant boy who discovers he has magic gifts and goes on a quest to defeat the Dark Lord. He posed the question: “What if the hero of the prophecy failed?” What if, in those final gripping moments of battle, the hero was slain and the Dark Lord took over the world?

The author’s teaser is as follows:

“A thousand years ago, the prophesied hero from lore rose up to overthrow a great and terrible evil. Only, he lost, and the Dark Lord took over and has been ruling with an iron fist for a thousand years.

Ash falls from the sky in this barren land, and mists come every night, deep and mysterious. In this setting, a gang of thieves decides that the prophecies were all lies and that they can’t trust in some fabled hero to save them. They decide to take matters into their own hands, and plan a daring heist of the dark lord himself, planning to use the emperor’s own wealth to bribe his armies away from him and take over the empire.”

However, this book is far from a “wham bam, thank you ma’am” type of novel. Although the heist is important, it takes a back seat to the development of the characters. Vin: distrustful orphan who spent her life on the streets. Unwilling to recognize what she is.

She takes the typical flat orphan character and evolves it into an immensely complex and realistic person with thoughts and feelings outside of the fantasy norm.

Kelsier: Charismatic group leader. Scoundrel, rogue, but a perfect person, right? Wrong. His flaws are slowly revealed, showing you his horrifying past while still bonding you to the character.

Sanderson is a genius with building fantastical worlds that an ordinary person can still relate to, and characters who are more than their stereotype. As Orson Scott Card (Author of Ender’s Game and many more) said:

“It’s rare for a fiction author to have much understanding on how leadership works or how love really takes root in the human heart. Sanderson is astonishingly wise.”

This book is amazing. It wraps you up in the storyline, and makes you stay for the characters. With Sandersons’s hallmark intricate magic-system and prodigious worldbuilding combined with an innovative theme, this series will be one you’ll read again and again.

…Writing about this has given me the indubitable urge to re-read this book…

Au revoir!

~~~

Edit : Just finished re-reading Mistborn: The Final Empire. I laughed, cried, and generally made a fool of myself to all onlookers. Just as great the second time around.

Edit II: After a huge amount of recommendations in the comments for me to read The Malazan Book of the Fallen, I bought it yesterday and shall read it just as soon as I finish Frank Herbert’s Dune. From what I’ve read about it and the raves in the comments, I expect there will soon be an addition to this answer!

Sammy Lahr

Votes: 6103

1) The Gentlemen Bastards Series

I would highly recommend the Gentlemen Bastards series by Scott Lynch. I’ve read them a few times, and every new read-through reveals more details—many of them humorous—that I had not teased from the text earlier. The worldbuilding is of similar quality to Sanderson and Rothfuss.

It has the grander scope of The Way of Kings while still retaining the intimate story of The Name of the Wind. It sits next to them on my shelf. The main difference it has between those two books would be it’s humor—it’s a little more crass, but will leave you literally rolling with laughter. I have hurt myself more than once doing just that.

2) A Song of Ice and Fire

I have yet to finish this series, but the first three have been on-par with any book I’ve read. Unlike, say, works by Rothfuss or Sanderson the magic system is considered “soft-magic”, meaning less detailed, more mystical. Despite that, the story and characters are anything but soft. This book is deeply engrossing; it’s characters possessing all of the dimensions that so many other books lack. This is the book that revolutionized the fantasy genre, inspiring other grim-and-gritty fantasy series like:

3) The First Law

This book has—hands down—the best written characters of any series I have come across. You will find yourself sympathizing with a torturer, hating the dashing swordsman, and rooting for the uncultured barbarian, only to have those feelings completely blown away and reversed in the matter of a chapter, only to have them switched again. The author plays with your emotions like a bard would his lute—that is—often and with great skill. This book is not for the faint of heart, but for those who can stand the substantial cut of The Blade Itself, it will reward you with an intricate storyline and a narrative unparalleled.

4) The Wheel of Time

This book is the definitive, classic fantasy series of our generation. Brandon Sanderson was chosen to finish the last several books in the series (after Robert Jordan passed) due to a similar writing-style. So if you like Brandon Sanderson, you’ll love this series. It is 14 books long but retains the same original, mesmerizing structure throughout it’s entirety. It never feels like it was expanded for commercial reasons, which is rare with large series. With a fan-base that includes most of the fantasy community and word-count nearly as huge, I highly reccomend this book, especially if you appreciate Rothfuss and Sanderson. It will keep you satisfied for a long time, and then there’s the rereads…

5) The Sword of Truth series

Read this if you want a bit of a break but still a very good story. You won’t read anything you haven’t before, but the way it is written and relayed is extraordinary. The word choice is very good, and the worldbuilding remarkable. As I said, some consider this cliche and closer to a video-game than a book, but I still recommend it if you have free time. 7–8/10

6) The Broken Empire Series by Mark Lawrence

This vividly-written book takes the fantasy genre in a new direction. The main character is not a hero by any means, (the opening chapter shows him leading a gang of thieves to pillage a town), but you find yourself sympathizing with him all the same.

This book is dark, brooding, and extremely well-written. It is fast-paced while balancing a great story-line. I found myself mesmerized by Lawrence’s first-person narrative yet horrified at the person I was reading about. But, beyond any doubt, this is a book that every fantasy fan should read at least once — and many will read over and over again.

The teaser is as follows:

“When he was nine, he watched as his mother and brother were killed before him. By the time he was thirteen, he was the leader of a band of bloodthirsty thugs. By fifteen, he intends to be king…

It’s time for Prince Honorous Jorg Ancrath to return to the castle he turned his back on, to take what’s rightfully his. Since the day he hung pinned on the thorns of a briar patch and watched Count Renar’s men slaughter his mother and young brother, Jorg has been driven to vent his rage. Life and death are no more than a game to him—and he has nothing left to lose.

But treachery awaits him in his father’s castle. Treachery and dark magic. No matter how fierce his will, can one young man conquer enemies with power beyond his imagining?”

The series is currently six books long (all best-sellers) and will keep you busy—locked in morbid, adventurous fascination—for some time.

7.) The Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

As millions of fans can claim, this book is magical in more ways than one.

After reading the series numerous times, I can still open up to any book and feel a rush of happiness. Enthrallment in the story-line, passion for the style of writing, and love for the characters themselves.

All of this goes to show that Rowling is astonishingly wise. She took this fantastical, unachievable world, and filled it with actual people. Not do-gooders with impossible strength, not perfect incarnations of light. No, she wrote about people. About their flaws. She showed how real people think. She painted the story of an average person and how they lived. She demonstrated with incredible accuracy how love really sets hold on a human heart.

That is something so rarely achieved in fantasy, and it makes me happy to read over and over again.

She immortalized this book in our hearts and minds as something real. With interactive elements and an entire world at your fingertips due to the extended franchise. It opens up role-play, movie watching, dedicated discussion groups. It offers something for the old and the young, introverted or extroverted. Reading over the course of the series, you get to see old friends grow up a world away. You get to know every aspect of them and grow to love them while having never seen them in your life.

It is, in some ways, the perfect book.

I may have outgrown it a bit, and look upon it less and less as the years go by, but it still never fails to make me smile.

“After all this time?”“Always.”

8) The Kingkiller Chronicle

I stopped counting how many times I read The Name of the Wind at the twentieth time through. Seriously. It has immensely impacted the way I write, my eloquence and diction, and truthfully—the way I see the world.

It is a deeply intimate coming-of-age story of a brilliant boy, and the not-so-brilliant scenarios he becomes involved with. It is the brainchild of Patrick Rothfuss, a perfectionist who has worked music into his words. Each page has a subtle grace, an incredible intricacy that can leave you laughing, crying, or clenching the book in rabid anticipation.

It is written impeccably—in such a fashion that the intelligent will experience a depth rarely found in the fantasy genre, yet balances it with action-packed scenes and rollicking story-telling.

If you give it the time, it will reward you greatly.

The worldbuilding is amazing, the characters three-dimensional, and the words are like magic. Truly a work of art; a song in everything but name.

10/10 would recommend.

I have yet to find a series with better worldbuilding than The Stormlight Archive by Brandon Sanderson:

As of yet, there’s only three books—but over three thousand pages and a planned cycle of ten novels of similar size. He spent over 15 years conceptualizing the idea, and has written “hundreds of thousands of words just in worldbuilding” for this series.

Sanderson’s magnum opus has a richer world than nearly any other you will come across. Every detail is extremely vivid, each description gradually peeling a dust-cover away from the vast, colorful tapestry that is the world within The Stormlight Archive.

This book has everything an avid and intelligent reader of fantasy could want. It has constantly evolving characters, massive battles and action, and subtle political intrigue. It is a story of assassins and artists, warriors and scholars, kings and the slaves that rule under them—all at the same time. It is told from many different perspectives to offer broad and contradicting views to the same events that occur.

It takes Tolkien-level detail and combines it with heart-pounding action sequences and battle scenes, all written by an author with hands down the best magic-systems I’ve ever witnessed. It incites emotions and storms of thought to ensnare you, pulling you into a world of physical tempestuous turmoil and people full of suffering. Internal and external conflicts mix into an amalgam that paint the world into a breathtaking adventure.

Mystery hides in every shadow—the line between history and myth blurring as intricate organizations throughout the world are revealed, their plans and purposes dubious at best.

This is one of the best things I’ve ever read, hands-down. The author releases books far more often than some other known fantasy authors (not complaining, I swear, but *cough* Patrick Rothfuss. *cough*) so you’ll never wait too long for the next volume.

If you want a book that will enthrall you, make you a better writer, and present you with thought-provoking philosophies at the same time, The Stormlight Archive is for you.

I heartily recommend it.

The Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson

This book takes your favorite classic story elements and utilizes them to flip the fantasy genre on it’s head. It’s a hybrid epic fantasy heist story with a focus on political intrigue and powerful action scenes.

As Sanderson was writing this book, he wanted two central themes at the foundation:

1) He knew he wanted a heist story, like Sneakers or Ocean’s Eleven involving a gang of gentlemen thieves who each had a distinctive magic power. He wanted to build an entire world and magic system to show how these people could work together, combining their magics to accomplish incredible tasks.

2) And this is the interesting part: He wanted a story where the good-guys lost. That’s right. Everybody’s read the story of the poor peasant boy who discovers he has magic gifts and goes on a quest to defeat the Dark Lord. He posed the question: “What if the hero of the prophecy failed?” What if, in those final gripping moments of battle, the hero was slain and the Dark Lord took over the world?

The author’s teaser is as follows:

“A thousand years ago, the prophesied hero from lore rose up to overthrow a great and terrible evil. Only, he lost, and the Dark Lord took over and has been ruling with an iron fist for a thousand years.

Ash falls from the sky in this barren land, and mists come every night, deep and mysterious. In this setting, a gang of thieves decides that the prophecies were all lies and that they can’t trust in some fabled hero to save them. They decide to take matters into their own hands, and plan a daring heist of the dark lord himself, planning to use the emperor’s own wealth to bribe his armies away from him and take over the empire.”

However, this book is far from a “wham bam, thank you ma’am” type of novel. Although the heist is important, it takes a back seat to the development of the characters. Vin: distrustful orphan who spent her life on the streets. Unwilling to recognize what she is.

She takes the typical flat orphan character and evolves it into an immensely complex and realistic person with thoughts and feelings outside of the fantasy norm.

Kelsier: Charismatic group leader. Scoundrel, rogue, but a perfect person, right? Wrong. His flaws are slowly revealed, showing you his horrifying past while still bonding you to the character.

Sanderson is a genius with building fantastical worlds that an ordinary person can still relate to, and characters who are more than their stereotype. As Orson Scott Card (Author of Ender’s Game and many more) said:

“It’s rare for a fiction author to have much understanding on how leadership works or how love really takes root in the human heart. Sanderson is astonishingly wise.”

This book is amazing. It wraps you up in the storyline, and makes you stay for the characters. With Sandersons’s hallmark intricate magic-system and prodigious worldbuilding combined with an innovative theme, this series will be one you’ll read again and again.

…Writing about this has given me the indubitable urge to re-read this book…

Au revoir!

These are just a few books I would suggest For more book reviews, suggestions, etc, try taking a look at my account. Sammy Lahr

Happy reading! 🙂

Johan Erasmus

Votes: 6507

Currently I would say that it is Christians.

So many Christians have such a big lack of understanding of Christianity, but they don’t keep quiet.

In the passage about the pharisee and the tax collector praying in the temple, most Christians identify themselves with the tax collector, but most actually resemble the pharisee.

Christians protests against abortion, homosexuality, etc. and sadly this seems to be mostly mean protests. Christians also get into heated arguments with nonbelievers. We protest but we don’t provide alternatives. It is easy to tell a scared and stressed out pregnant girl that adoption is a better alternative if you are going leave her to her own means for the nine months that she will have to carry the child she is going to give away.

Christians use passages like the one about the splinter in the eye to defend themselves instead of learning from it.

When Christians go against the following, they just do damage.

1 Corinthians 13:1-‬2 ESV If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.

Jesus drew crowds to him, he had to occasionally go hide from people or get on a boat to have some alone time, but modern Christians mostly turn people against Christianity.

Christianity is supposed to be about positive actions, but it has become more about negative preaching and condemnation.

The world of today hates Christianity because of the actions of Christians.

Rohit Shinde

Votes: 586

Here are some books which I feel are mind expanding.

Note: Some of them may already have been mentioned in answers below, but I hope there is at least one new book you found out through this list.

1. Why Does the World Exist? – Jim Holt

It asks the question “Why is there a world when there should be nothing?” It is related to metaphysics. It is also tinged with philosophy and is quite a good read.2. Bulfinch’s Mythology – Thomas Bulfinch

This book retells the Greek Myths in all their glory. Learn about Zeus, Venus, Hera and other Olympian Gods. These gods are fallible too. After reading this book, you will have a greater understanding of the Greek mythology. It is also interspersed with Roman Mythology.3. Supernormal: Science, Yoga and the Evidence for Extraordinary abilities – Dean Radin

Can yoga and meditation unleash our inherent supernormal mental powers, such as telepathy, clairvoyance, and precognition? Is it really possible to perceive another person’s thoughts and intentions? Influence objects with our minds? Envision future events? And is it possible that some of the superpowers described in ancient legends, science fiction, and comic books are actually real, and patiently waiting for us behind the scenes? Are we now poised for an evolutionary trigger to pull the switch and release our full potentials? These and many more questions are answered in this book. It is certainly a very engrossing read.

4. Alone Together – Sherry Turkle

In Alone Together, MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It’s a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for—and sacrificing—in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today’s self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

5. The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less – Barry Schwartz

In The Paradox of Choice, Barry Schwartz explains at what point choice–the hallmark of individual freedom and self-determination that we so cherish–becomes detrimental to our psychological and emotional well-being. In accessible, engaging, and anecdotal prose, Schwartz shows how the dramatic explosion in choice–from the mundane to the profound challenges of balancing career, family, and individual needs–has paradoxically become a problem instead of a solution. Schwartz also shows how our obsession with choice encourages us to seek that which makes us feel worse.

6. The Purity Myth: How America’s Obsession with Virginity is Hurting Young Women – Jessica Valent

The Purity Myth presents a revolutionary argument that girls and women are overly valued for their sexuality, as well as solutions for a future without a damaging emphasis on virginity.

7. Prisoner’s Dilemma – William Poundstone

A layman’s introduction to Game Theory. It is based on the work by Von Neumann. And its thoroughly interesting.8. The Ethical Brain: The Science of our Moral Dilemmas – Michael S. Gazzaniga

In The Ethical Brain, preeminent neuroscientist Michael S. Gazzaniga presents the emerging social and ethical issues arising out of modern-day brain science and challenges the way we look at them. Courageous and thought-provoking — a work of enormous intelligence, insight, and importance — this book explores the hitherto uncharted landscape where science and society intersect

9. Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict – Michael Klare

International security expert Michael T. Klare argues that in the early decades of the new millennium, wars will be fought not over ideology but over access to dwindling supplies of precious natural commodities. The political divisions of the Cold War, Klare asserts, have given way to a global scramble for oil, natural gas, minerals, and water. And as armies throughout the world define resource security as a primary objective, widespread instability is bound to follow, especially in those areas where competition for essential materials overlaps with long-standing territorial and religious disputes. In this clarifying view, the recent explosive conflict between the United States and Islamic extremism stands revealed as the predictable consequence of consumer nations seeking to protect the vital resources they depend on.

10. The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing And What Can Be Done About It? – Paul Collier

In the universally acclaimed and award-winning The Bottom Billion, Paul Collier reveals that fifty failed states–home to the poorest one billion people on Earth–pose the central challenge of the developing world in the twenty-first century. The book shines much-needed light on this group of small nations, largely unnoticed by the industrialized West, that are dropping further and further behind the majority of the world’s people, often falling into an absolute decline in living standards.

11. The Ascent Of Money – Niall Fergusson

Niall Ferguson follows the money to tell the human story behind the evolution of finance, from its origins in ancient Mesopotamia to the latest upheavals on what he calls Planet Finance.

12. The Rational Optimist: How Prosperity Evolves

Matt Ridley does more than describe how things are getting better. He explains why. Prosperity comes from everybody working for everybody else. The habit of exchange and specialization—which started more than 100,000 years ago—has created a collective brain that sets human living standards on a rising trend. The mutual dependence, trust, and sharing that result are causes for hope, not despair.

13. The Code Breakers – David Kahn

The magnificent, unrivaled history of codes and ciphers — how they’re made, how they’re broken, and the many and fascinating roles they’ve played since the dawn of civilization in war, business, diplomacy, and espionage.

14. The Revenge of Geography – Robert Kaplan

In The Revenge of Geography, Kaplan builds on the insights, discoveries, and theories of great geographers and geopolitical thinkers of the near and distant past to look back at critical pivots in history and then to look forward at the evolving global scene.

15. Justice: Whats The Right Thing To Do – Michael Sandel

What are our obligations to others as people in a free society? Should government tax the rich to help the poor? Is the free market fair? Is it sometimes wrong to tell the truth? Is killing sometimes morally required? Is it possible, or desirable, to legislate morality? Do individual rights and the common good conflict?

These questions are at the core of our public life today—and at the heart of Justice, in which Michael J. Sandel shows how a surer grasp of philosophy can help us to make sense of politics, morality, and our own convictions as well.

16. Mind Wars – Jonathan Moreno

Jonathan D. Moreno investigates the deeply intertwined worlds of cutting-edge brain science, U.S. defense agencies, and a volatile geopolitical landscape where a nation’s weaponry must go far beyond bombs and men. The first-ever exploration of the connections between national security and brain research, Mind Wars: Brain Research and National Defensereveals how many questions crowd this gray intersection of science and government and urges us to begin to answer them.

17. The Myth of The Rational Voter – Bryan Caplan

The greatest obstacle to sound economic policy is not entrenched special interests or rampant lobbying, but the popular misconceptions, irrational beliefs, and personal biases held by ordinary voters. This is economist Bryan Caplan’s sobering assessment in this provocative and eye-opening book. Caplan argues that voters continually elect politicians who either share their biases or else pretend to, resulting in bad policies winning again and again by popular demand.

18. The Rise and Fall of the British Empire – James Lawrence

Great Britain’s geopolitical role has undergone many changes over the last four centuries. Once a maritime superpower and ruler of half the world, Britain now occupies an isolated position as an economically fragile island often at odds with her European neighbors.Lawrence James has written a comprehensive, perceptive, and insighful history of the British Empire. Spanning the years from 1600 to the present day, this critically acclaimed book combines detailed scholarship with readable popular history.

19. The Nazi Doctors: Medical Killing And the Psychology of Genocide – Robert Jay Lifton

Nazi doctors did more than conduct bizarre experiments on concentration-camp inmates; they supervised the entire process of medical mass murder, from selecting those who were to be exterminated to disposing of corpses. Lifton (The Broken Connection; The Life of the Self shows that this medically supervised killing was done in the name of “healing,” as part of a racist program to cleanse the Aryan body politic).

20. Civilization: The West and The Rest – Niall Fergusson

What was it about the civilization of Western Europe that allowed it to trump the outwardly superior empires of the Orient? The answer, Niall Ferguson argues, was that the West developed six “killer applications”?that the Rest lacked: competition, science, democracy, medicine, consumerism and the work ethic. The key question today is whether or not the West has lost its monopoly on these six things. If so, Ferguson warns, we may be living through the end of Western ascendancy.

21. Influencer: The Power to Change Anything – Kerry Patterson

Influencing human behavior is one of the most difficult challenges faced by leaders. This book provides powerful insight into how to make behavior change that will last.22. Big Data – Kenneth Kukier

“Big data” refers to our burgeoning ability to crunch vast collections of information, analyze it instantly, and draw sometimes profoundly surprising conclusions from it. This emerging science can translate myriad phenomena—from the price of airline tickets to the text of millions of books—into searchable form, and uses our increasing computing power to unearth epiphanies that we never could have seen before. A revolution on par with the Internet or perhaps even the printing press, big data will change the way we think about business, health, politics, education, and innovation in the years to come. It also poses fresh threats, from the inevitable end of privacy as we know it to the prospect of being penalized for things we haven’t even done yet, based on big data’s ability to predict our future behavior.

23. The Fine Art Of Small Talk – Debra Fine

The Fine Art of Small Talk will help you learn to feel more comfortable in any type of social situation, from lunch with the boss to an association event to a cocktail party where you don’t know a soul.

24. In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto – Michael Pollan

Pollan proposes a new answer to the question of what we should eat that comes down to seven simple but liberating words: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. Pollan’s bracing and eloquent manifesto shows us how we can start making thoughtful food choices that will enrich our lives, enlarge our sense of w…

Bobby Lynn

Votes: 8841

Are fiction books childish?

If you define “childish” as being suitable or appealing to children, then obviously not, since the majority of fiction books are intended for and sold to adults.

If you mean fiction books are “childish” because they are not “real” then all films, TV (non documentary/news), plays, theme parks, and so on are childish too.

Michael J Foy

Votes: 8678

The Foundation!

Its a classic trilogy by Isaac Asimov and not to be confused with its sad depiction on Apple TV+.

I’ve read and re-read it several times. Here’s a measure of how good it is.

There was a scene that I recalled reading and looked forward to experiencing again recently. It was a tension-filled clash when a mysterious good guy finally confronts the bad guy called the Mule. The Mule threatened to undo progress that the galactic civilization was making towards ending a dark ages. The conflict didn’t take place with ray guns or martial arts. It took place in the mind.

Before reading it again I would’ve guessed it played out over 2 pages. It was 30. My eyes were glued to the book for 30 pages and it felt like 2.

You know how hard it is for a writer to maintain that level of tension and anticipation in one scene over 30 pages? I can tell you from experience that it’s damn hard.

The Foundation Trilogy is a great set of novels that have stood the test of time since they were first written and published in the 40s and 50s.

Clare Celea

Votes: 2628

Do you believe that the book “A Child Called It” is fictional or non-fictional? Why or why not?

I don’t think it matters.

Abuse like Dave Pelzer describes happens. It happened in the era he writes about and it’s happening right now. I’m not in a position to say whether everything he describes happened to him personally, but his book opened the way for abuse victims to talk and write about their experiences. It got a conversation started about parental (and particularly maternal) abuse.

That’s a powerfully good thing. It’s vital that mothers are not assumed to be incapable of abuse, because their victims need to be seen and supported. Dave Pelzer was a trailblazer for that discussion, and in my view that’s what matters.

Ahmed Hegazy

Votes: 8629

The direction you face during prayer is simply a matter of obedience to God. The building in Mecca, that Muslims face in their prayer, cannot do any harm nor good to anybody even if it wanted to. And if it weren’t for the fact that God ordered us to face this direction in our prayer, I would have never done that.

Muslims worship the one true God. He is not a different God, He is the God of Abraham, Noah, Moses, Jesus and Muhammad peace be upon them all. And God, the Creator and Almighty, ordered us to pray facing the mosque in Jeruselam initially, then He ordered us to turn towards the mosque in Mecca.

The Mosque in Mecca was the first house of worship ever to be built on the earth. The mosque in Jeruselam was the second to be built, 40 years after the Mosque in Mecca. Muslims do not worship the Mosque itself nor any rocks associated with it. They worship the one true Lord. Creator of the Heavens and the Earth and King of the Day of Judgement.

Ahmed Seddek

Votes: 1073

Muhammad could never author it for several reasons:

1- He was speaking Standard Arabic fluently, but he couldn’t read and write.

2- The way he spoke to people was very different from the Quran. Those who know and speak Arabic very well can easily distinguish between his sayings and the verses of the Quran, which means that it was not authored by him.

3- If it were authored by him, why would he criticize and blame on himself in that book ? There are, as far as I know, three different verses in three different chapters of the Quran that criticize and blame Muhammad for some actions he took.

4- The Quran predicted Byzantine resurgence in Byzantine-Sasanian War 602 c.–628 c right after the Byzantines were defeated and dominated by the Sasanians. How would Muhammad make such a successful prediction ?

5- The Quran stated several predictions and descriptions of things that were never known by anybody before. One example is an accurate description of the stages of formation of human fetus in the 23rd chapter.

6- Muhammad’s companions saw him in the state of “revelation”, when he used to receive the verses from God by the Angel, and they knew how he looked in that state.

7- Once a time, Muhammad’s enemies in Mecca asked him for more verses regarding a certain topic. If he were the one authoring it, he would have just given them these verses in a very short time. Yet, that did not happen. He had no revelation for several days and nights, meaning that he was not the one authoring it.

This is what I have in mind now, and I am sure there are more reasons.

Saddam Butt

Votes: 2871

I am a just a Muslim but since I only take advice from Quran I may fell into the category Quranist and Quran only because now I find it really hard to practice the norms of Muslims not because of Digital or westernization but with the majority clashes of Shia/Sunni/Wahhabi. The once Islamic religious parties especially in my country are now more of a cult than actually a missionary group. They preach what they believe will bring more money in their charity box. There are many notable good guys as well but you will continuously will see the so called Islamist badgering them as kafir and infidels because he is turning out to be better than them and getting more followers. Religion has become a big business in my country and to be very honest. People print their own version of Hadith in mini booklets and majority of them are not even Hadith but some self made sermons made on self assumptions. Our society is so much anguished in this situation. No one wants to admit their mistakes/sins when it comes to major religious leaders. That is why more and more young boys are not attending mosque, they are not following religion or they have no intention to be religion. A guy who just did adultery keeps a beard and suddenly become a pious Muslim just to avoid punishment . This is a common fashion among rich elites and normal boys now. You make out with a girl, you feel shame ,you grow a beard, do a drama that you are getting some kind of message and the next semester you shaved your beard and you have no remorse and if the girl ask him to marry her, he will pressure her on keeping her mouth shut or else. This is not done by media or facebook but our own so called religious mullah, When a boy from their community does adultery , they either cover it or they let him go after some punishment. This encourages normal boys to do the same as they see that not even the religious guys have any remorse or fear of Allah.

So the question was why I am a Quranist. Well because I don’t trust anything what these Mullah says even if its true.

Shreyas Patel ( श्रेयस पटेल )Aditi RajeshAakanksha Saharan

Votes: 3362

Books don’t change people; paragraphs do, Sometimes even sentences. – John piper

Sounds interesting isn’t it?

Here list goes:

“Some books you read. Some books you enjoy.

But Some books just swallow you up, Heart and soul.”

Image Source :- Google, Pinterest & My phone gallery!

Cheers & Peace ❤️

Edit 1 :- Here goes my personal collection too.❤️

Edit 2 :- First time got 7K upvotes. Thank you so much all the Quoran who appreciate my answer.

Have a good day.

||SD||

C.S. Friedman

Votes: 3221

Have fiction books gotten worse?

No, but more bad ones are being published.

Isabella Couch

Votes: 5395

Is Harry Potter a fiction or non-fiction book?

Hmmm. Let us all think long and hard about this deeply intellectual question. Is a book about magical young adults going to a magical school hidden from non magical people by magic. A this school, the young adults learn how to cast spells that can do stuff we can only imagine and more. Later in this series a 99.99% evil magical wizard who wishes to kill the young adults. With magic. There appears to be a recurring theme here, but I can’t quite pinpoint what it is. Oh well. I suppose I will just have to guess. Non-fiction.

Gabrielle Koetsier

Votes: 7313

Fiction

Nonfiction

Honestly, I don’t read too much non-fiction because I find fiction to be far more interesting. I could have added like fifty more books to the fiction section, but that would have gotten a bit long! Hopefully this is a good list of book recommendations for you; definitely check some of them out at your local library if you get the chance.

Doug Dingus

Votes: 2853

What is the most frightening book you’ve read, fiction or otherwise?

I am not really surprised that Stephen King shows up here. He really does understand horror.

“IT” was very scary. The first scene shocks the reader, who is then taken into a great back story centering on the lives of the main characters as kids. This first scene was so ugly, my wife has refused to read the rest of the book to this day!

For me to get really scared on a feeling basis, not just a rational one is to have the story be immersive. And the difference between simply feeling scared and a more rational scare works like this:

One feels scared when they are in a scary place, or witnessi

Lynne Benedict

Votes: 1053

If someone wanted to begin reading science fiction, what three books would you recommend as a primer?

Only one of these would serious science fiction aficionados consider a ‘big’ or ‘classic’ novel, but I think these three give a good overall sense of the broad range of good science fiction story ideas.

Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein. A ‘classic’ and a cult classic, this novel is about the first person born on Mars, and then upon the death of his parents immediately after, raised by Martians. When he was finally ‘rescued’ as a young man and brought home to Earth, you can imagine the complete culture shock. And when he meets his first woman…

Iceworld by Hal Clement. First Contact f

Dharmendra Singh

Votes: 1710

Is a cow worthy to be worshipped as a holy animal?

If these statues are worthy to be worshipped then a cow is far more worthy to be worshipped.

I have never tasted the milk of these statues but yes a cow’s milk gives lives.

For some reason my wife was not able to feed my son. What doctor said was amazing -“Use second mothers milk only”.

I asked “What do you mean”?

“Cow”, the doctor said.

Randy Rogers

Votes: 2792

Which are the 5 best fiction novels one must read?

Hashmina Samreen

Votes: 3679

Why do Muslims go around the shrine in Mecca? If Islam is against idol worship, then, shouldn’t going around the shrine be considered a form of idol worship?

One of the iconic images of Islam and the Muslims is the image of hundreds of thousands of Muslims prostrating as one before the Ka’bah; a cuboid structure, draped in black cloth, found in the centre of the city of Makkah, in what is now Saudi Arabia. Many non-Muslims mistakenly assume that the Ka’bah is a kind of idol which Muslims use in their worship and rituals, when nothing could be further from the truth.

The essence of Islam is that all worship is directed to God alone, and that nobody deserves any share in those things that are part of His exclusive rights. In Islam, every single act of

Isaac Ramone

Votes: 4015

What are your recommended fictional books?

Top 6 of Isaac’s favourite fiction books of all time (6 being the worst of my favourite and 1 being the best)

6. Seven Realms

So the story is basically about a thief named Han Alister who has had the cuffs on him his whole life, he was also a gang leader. Raisa the princess of the fells is set to be heir of the Grey Wolf Throne but a plot is set in motion to make Micah Bayer, son of the High Wizard the King of the Fells. Eventually the join forces to defend the Throne

I’m giving kind of non spoilers reviews so bear with me

5. The Secrets of the Immortal Nicolas Flamel

Two twins Sophie and Josh are

The overhead is the best answer to Is the book ‘Conversations with the Crow’ trustworthy or fiction? that we researched. Follow us for more interesting answers!

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